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There are two areas of study in the Level 9 curriculum for Geography: Biomes and Food Security and Geographies of Interconnections.

AusVELSEdit

Geography was added to AusVELS in December 2013. The following information has been taken from the VCAA website.

Biomes and food security focuses on investigating the role of the biotic environment and its role in food and fibre production. This area of study examines the biomes of the world, their alteration and significance as a source of food and fibre, and the environmental challenges and constraints on expanding food production in the future. These distinctive aspects of biomes, food production and food security are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

Geographies of interconnections focuses on investigating how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places throughout the world in a wide variety of ways, and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments. This area of study examines the interconnections between people and places through the products people buy and the effects of their production on the places that make them. Students examine the ways that transport and information and communication technologies have made it possible for an increasing range of services to be provided internationally, and for people in isolated rural areas to connect to information, services and people in other places. These distinctive aspects of interconnection are investigated using studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

The content of this level is organised into two strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and Geographical Inquiry and Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated manner, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

Key inquiry questions

A framework for developing students’ geographical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided through the inclusion of inquiry questions and specific inquiry skills, including the use and interpretation of maps, photographs, digital resources and other representations of geographical data.

The key inquiry questions for Level 9 are articulated below.

1.      1.. What are the causes and consequences of change in places and environments and how can this change     be managed?

2.       2.  What are the future implications of changes to places and environments?

3.       3,  Why are interconnections and interdependencies important for the future of places and environments?

VCAA December 2013

Week Tasks Assessment
1

SPICESS

P1 Scale, Place

P2 Interconnection, Change

P3 Environment, Sustainability


P4 Space,  Activities 1-7 pg7

Immersion
2

Understanding

P1 1.1 What is a Biome?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: Name the five major biomes on the Earth and classify them as either aquatic or terrestrial

Activity 2: Identify the broad characteristics biomes share.

P2 1.2 How do we use the grassland biome?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: What is a grassland?

Activity 3: Why are grasslands an important environment?

Activity 4: Describe the major threats to this environment?

P3 1.5 What are Australia’s major biomes?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: Explain why Australia has such a wide variety of biomes.

Activity 7a: Describe the interconnection between biomes and climate.

Change

P4 2.1 How can we feed the world?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 3: Explain the impact of an increasing population on world environments


Activity 4: Explain why agricultural innovations can change food production.

Formative
3

P1 2.2 What does the world eat?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: Make a list of the main staple foods of the world and the places (continents) where they are grown.

Activity 2 What is biofuel?

P2 2.6 How is food produced in Australia?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 4: Explain why extensive large-scale cattle and sheep farms are typically located in remote and arid regions of Australia.

Activity 5: Using the map of farm production in Australia, describe and explain the location of

 a)      Wheat farms,

 b)      Dairy farms.

P3 2.8 Why is rice an important food crop?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 2: What is meant by the term ‘monoculture’?

Activity 5: Explain the environmental issues that may affect future rice production.

P4 3.1 How does producing food affect biomes?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: Describe the biophysical environment.


Activity 3: Explain how a bird might interconnect with the four Earth spheres.

4

P1 3.5 How do we lose land?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: List 2 human and 2 natural causes of land degradation.

Activity 4: Create an annotated sketch to show the interconnection between plants and soil (points).

P2 4.1 Who’s not hungry?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: What is meant by the term ‘food security’?

Activity 4: Compare the 2 photos in figures 1 and 2.

a)      What are the similarities and differences between the food supplies for the 2 families?

b)      List 10 food items that you could live on for a week while still maintaining a balanced diet.

P3 4.2 Who is hungry?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1: What factors make people vulnerable to food insecurity?

Activity 5: Explain how conflict can lead to food insecurity.

P4 5.1 Can we feed the future world population?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1a: Examine figure 2. Which continent has the greatest amount of arable land per person and which continent has the least?


Activity 8: Draw a poster or advertisement that informs Australians about Plumpy’nut and seeks donations for its use.

5

Future

P1 5.3 What food Aid occurs at a global scale?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 5 Refer to the Case Study.

a)      List the advantages and disadvantages of cash vouchers

b)      Use the WFP weblink in your eBookPLUS to help you explain the benefits of food aid.

P2 5.4 Do Australians need food aid?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 2: How many people in Australia were living in poverty in 2010-2011?

Activity 4: Explain why there might be difficulties with access to food in 2050 if 25% of the population is over 65.


P 3&4 Biomes and Food Security Inquiry (pages 98 and 99)

6 P1-4 Continue Inquiry  
7

Interconnections

P1 6.1 How do we see places?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 4 With your class, make a list of the places or landmarks in your community that you use on a regular basis. Rate the importance of each on a scale of 1-3 with 1 being most important. Collate the data to find out which places are most and least important to your class.

P2 6.3 How do we manage places?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1. Explain how the perceptions and uses of Melbourne’s Laneways have changed over time.

Activity 6. On our Melbourne day trip complete the Laneways of Melbourne Walk. Are the Laneways sustainable places for people. Where in Ballarat could a similar project be done?

P3 6.9 What is the remotest place on Earth?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1 Where is the remotest place on Earth? Why is it so remote?

Activity 4 What data was used to create the map in figure 1

Activity 8 Physical distance is just one way that we feel connected or remote. What other developments will reduce the ‘tyranny of distance’ in the 21st century?

P4 8.1 How does trade connect us?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 2 Name the 4 levels of industry and give an example of a good as it moves through the production process.

8

P1 8.2 How does trade connect Australia with the world?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 2. What are Australia’s three most important exports and imports?

EBook interactivity: Search light id: INT3339

P2 How is food traded around the world?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 3 Refer to figure 1.

a)      What is the value of food trade from Australasia to Europe?

b)      What is the value of food trade from Europe to Australasia?

c)       Is there a balance in this food trade based on your calculations in a) and b)

d)      Place the regions of the world in decreasing order by volume of food trade.

P3 8.5 Are global players altering the industrial landscape?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1 Why have many countries moved their production to offshore places?

Activity 2 What are sweatshops?

P4 9.2 Who has access to technology?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 4 Refer to figure 1. What factors do you think affect the pattern of internet use throughout the world?

9

P1 9.3 What are the consequences of unequal access?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 1. Define the term ‘digital divided’ in your own words.

P2 9.5 How has technology improved in Australia?

Read then complete the following.

Activity 3 Why is it crucial that Australia builds the NBN?

Activity 5 Imagine what life would be like without the internet and mobile phones. Write a letter to a friend about your life without such technology.

P3 Inquiry Project Use 9.6, 9.7 and 9.8 to work out a way to reduce the problems associated with e-waste.

P4 Continue Inquiry Project define the problems and research solutions

10

P1 Continue Inquiry Project research

P2 Continue Inquiry Project research

P3 Continue Inquiry Project create presentation of learning

P4 Complete and submit Inquiry Project

Level 9 Achievement StandardEdit

By the end of Level 9, students explain how geographical processes change the characteristics of places.

They analyse interconnections between people, places and environments and explain how these interconnections influence people, and change places and environments.

They predict changes in the characteristics of places over time and identify the possible implications of change for the future. They analyse alternative strategies to a geographical challenge using environmental, social and economic criteria.

Students use initial research to identify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to collect and select useful and reliable geographical data and information. They record and represent multi-variable data in a range of appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including maps that comply with cartographic conventions.

They use a range of methods and digital technologies to analyse maps, data and other information to propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies across time and space and to predict outcomes. Students synthesise maps, data and other information to draw reasoned conclusions.

They present findings, arguments and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and digital technologies in a range of appropriate communication forms.

Students propose action in response to a geographical challenge taking account of environmental, economic and social factors and predict the outcomes and consequences of their proposal.

VCAA December 2013